Taleb is a very difficult person to pin down. As Ralph Nader put it last month: “You cannot pigeonhole him!” But I think that introduction to his insight (and foresight) should suffice to convince even those who have never heard of him before that he’s worth listening to.

Taleb is a former trader, a professor at NYU, and the author of several best-sellers including Fooled by RandomnessThe Black SwanAntifragile, and his just-released Skin in the GameBut perhaps its best to classify him as a “flaneur,” someone who — according to the Oxford Dictionary, “saunters around observing society.”

Also see written article here: https://www.fool.com/investing/2018/04/03/motley-fool-interview-nassim-nicholas-taleb.aspx

The Motley Fool interviews Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Posted on

June 11th, 2018

Category

General

Nassim Nicholas Taleb and Tyler Cowen

“Though what Taleb was really after was a discussion with Bryan (read that here), the philosopher, mathematician, and author most recently of Skin in the Game also generously agreed to a conversation with Tyler.

Continue reading on Medium: https://medium.com/conversations-with-tyler/tyler-cowen-nassim-nicholas-taleb-skin-in-the-game-black-swan-104620da8a57

[Podcast] Conversations with Tyler: Nassim Nicholas Taleb on Self-Education and Doing the Math

Posted on

May 31st, 2018

Category

Audio, Podcasts

Antifragile explains why understanding x is different from f(x) the payoff or exposure from x. Most of the harm/gains come from f(x) being convex or concave not understanding x. Forecasting is off an average, and average is for academics and other morons.

This video illustrates the point with XIV that went bust while being correct about volatility –and why people who make money are usually wrong.

[YouTube] Explaining both the XIV trade and why forecasting is BS

Posted on

February 28th, 2018

Category

MOOCs, Videos

Nassim’s latest book Skin in the Game it finally out!

Nassim Taleb Skin in the Game

Click here to view on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2FuMkrl

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Black Swan, a bold new work that challenges many of our long-held beliefs about risk and reward, politics and religion, finance and personal responsibility

In his most provocative and practical book yet, one of the foremost thinkers of our time redefines what it means to understand the world, succeed in a profession, contribute to a fair and just society, detect nonsense, and influence others. Citing examples ranging from Hammurabi to Seneca, Antaeus the Giant to Donald Trump, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the willingness to accept one’s own risks is an essential attribute of heroes, saints, and flourishing people in all walks of life.

As always both accessible and iconoclastic, Taleb challenges long-held beliefs about the values of those who spearhead military interventions, make financial investments, and propagate religious faiths. Among his insights:

• For social justice, focus on symmetry and risk sharing. You cannot make profits and transfer the risks to others, as bankers and large corporations do. You cannot get rich without owning your own risk and paying for your own losses. Forcing skin in the game corrects this asymmetry better than thousands of laws and regulations.
• Ethical rules aren’t universal. You’re part of a group larger than you, but it’s still smaller than humanity in general.
• Minorities, not majorities, run the world. The world is not run by consensus but by stubborn minorities imposing their tastes and ethics on others.
• You can be an intellectual yet still be an idiot. “Educated philistines” have been wrong on everything from Stalinism to Iraq to low-carb diets.
• Beware of complicated solutions (that someone was paid to find). A simple barbell can build muscle better than expensive new machines.
• True religion is commitment, not just faith. How much you believe in something is manifested only by what you’re willing to risk for it.

The phrase “skin in the game” is one we have often heard but rarely stopped to truly dissect. It is the backbone of risk management, but it’s also an astonishingly rich worldview that, as Taleb shows in this book, applies to all aspects of our lives. As Taleb says, “The symmetry of skin in the game is a simple rule that’s necessary for fairness and justice, and the ultimate BS-buster,” and “Never trust anyone who doesn’t have skin in the game. Without it, fools and crooks will benefit, and their mistakes will never come back to haunt them.”

Nassim Taleb – Skin in the Game: Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life

Posted on

February 25th, 2018

Category

General, Links, Writing

Pourquoi devrait-on cesser d’écouter ceux qui parlent au lieu d’agir ? Pourquoi les entreprises font-elles faillite ? Comment se fait-il que nous avons plus d’esclaves aujourd’hui qu’au temps des Romains ? Pourquoi imposer la démocratie aux autres pays ne marche jamais ?

Réponse : trop nombreux sont ceux qui dirigent le monde sans mettre leur peau en jeu.

Dans son livre le plus provocateur à ce jour, Taleb donne sa définition et ébranle les nôtres : qu’est-ce que comprendre le monde, réussir sa vie professionnelle, contribuer à une société juste ou injuste, détecter les non-sens et influencer les autres ?

D’Hammourabi à Sénèque, du géant Antée à Donald Trump, de Kant à Gros Tony, Taleb choisit ses exemples et montre qu’avoir quelque chose à perdre, vouloir accepter le risque, y voir une question de justice, d’honneur et de sacrifice, est pour les héros, les saints et bon nombre d’êtres humains épanouis… une essentielle règle du jeu.

 

[YouTube] Jouer sa peau, le nouveau livre de Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Posted on

January 3rd, 2018

Category

MOOCs, Videos

The anachronism shown. The Phyla and Waves Models of Classification by Semiticists is not very scientific.

It would be an anachronism to assert that Italian is a dialect of Catalan, but safe to say that Italian comes from Latin. But when it comes to Lebanese (more generally NorthWestern Levantine), the “politically correct” Arabist-think-tank view is that is is derived from Arabic (Lebanese “dialect” of Arabic) to accommodate sensitivities — even linguists find arguments to violate the arrow of time to serve the interest of panArabism. In situations where there are similarities between a word used in Leb and Arabic, they insist it comes from Arabic not from a common root. (Most Lebanese are confused by diglossia as one is not supposed to write in the spoken language).

https://medium.com/east-med-project-history-philology-and-genetics/no-lebanese-is-not-a-dialect-of-arabic-e95320c164c

Medium: No, Lebanese is not a “dialect” of Arabic

Posted on

January 3rd, 2018

Category

General, Links, Writing

Oct.16 — The Black Monday crash was 30 years ago this week. “Black Swan” author Nassim Taleb was a trader for First Boston at the time. He made a lot of money while others lost fortunes. He recounts the experience with Bloomberg’s Erik Schatzker.

Also see written article here: The Crash of ’87, From the Wall Street Players Who Lived It

Nassim Taleb on Bloomberg: Black Monday, Fed, Market Lessons

Posted on

October 19th, 2017

Category

General, Videos